Newland Health Centre
187 Cottingham Road Hull East Yorkshire HU5 2EG
Tel: 01482 492219
Fax: 01482 441418
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Child Immunisation


If a vaccine is given when a baby still has antibodies to the disease, the antibodies can stop the vaccine working. This is why routine childhood immunisations do not start until a baby is two months old, before the antibodies a baby gets from its mother have stopped working. This is also why it is important for parents to stick to the immunisation schedule, as a delay can leave a baby unprotected. A delay can increase the chance of adverse reactions to some vaccines, such as pertussis (whooping cough).



Vaccination Schedule


At two months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At three months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection

At four months old:
  • Diptheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) (DTaP/IPV/Hib) - one injection
  • Meningitis C (meningococcal group C) (MenC) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

At around 12 months old:
  • Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and meningitis C (Hib/MenC) - booster dose in one injection

At around 13 months old:
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection
  • Pneumococcal infection - pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) - one injection

Three years four months to five years old (pre-school):
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough) and polio (dTaP/IPV or DTaP/IPV) - one injection
  • Measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) (MMR) - one injection

13 to 18 years old:
  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio (Td/IPV) - one injection

Further reading


There are some excellent websites that will answer all your questions and queries about immunisation and vaccination. If you are worried about giving the MMR vaccine, you should access the MMR site.


www.immunisation.nhs.uk The most comprehensive, up-to-date and accurate source of information on vaccines, disease and immunisation in the UK.


www.immunisation.nhs.uk/Vaccines/MMR This website has been put together to answer any questions you might have about MMR. You can look for information and resources in the MMR library, ask an expert panel a question, and read up on the latest news stories relating to MMR.

Summer Health
Barbecue food safety
It's important to cook food thoroughly at a barbecue to avoid food poisoning. Food poisoning is usually mild, and most people get better within a week. But sometimes it can be more severe, even deadly, so it’s important to take the risks seriously. Children, older people and those with weakened immune systems are particularly vulnerable to food poisoning.
The two main risk factors to cooking on the barbecue are:

  • undercooked meat
  • spreading germs from raw meat onto food that’s ready to eat

This is because raw or undercooked meat can contain germs that cause food poisoning, such as salmonella, E.coli and campylobacter. However, it’s easy to kill these germs by cooking meat until it is piping hot throughout.
When you’re cooking any kind of meat on a barbecue, such as poultry (chicken or turkey), pork, steak, burgers or sausages, make sure:
  • The coals are glowing red with a powdery grey surface before you start cooking, as this means that they're hot enough.
  • Frozen meat is properly thawed before you cook it.
  • You turn the meat regularly and move it around the barbecue to cook it evenly.

Remember that meat is safe to eat only when:
  • It is piping hot in the centre.
  • There is no pink meat visible.
  • Any juices are clear.



Hay Fever
Hay fever affects around 20% of people in the UK. Lindsey McManus of Allergy UK offers some tips on avoiding the causes and reducing your symptoms.
"The main triggers of hay fever are tree and grass pollen,” says Lindsey. “The pollen count is always higher when it’s a nice, bright, sunny day.”
Top Tips:
  • If grass makes you sneeze, get someone else to mow your lawn. If you react to grass and you spend time on the lawn, you'll get symptoms.
  • Create a barrier by smearing Vaseline inside your nostrils.
  • Don’t sit outside between 4pm and 7pm or in the early morning, as the pollen count is highest at these times.
  • Don’t sleep or drive with the windows open, as this will allow pollen to come in.
  • Damp dust regularly.
  • Wash your hair. Pollen is sticky and may be in your hair.
  • Vacuum. Pollen can live in carpet for up to three months.
  • Talk to your GP or pharmacist about any treatment you’re taking for hay fever as it might be worth trying a new treatment. The same antihistamine [anti-allergy treatment] doesn’t always work for someone year after year. Try something different, such as a nasal spray or a new antihistamine.

Allergy UK helpline: 01322 619898



Sun Safety
It's important to protect your and your children's skin in the sun to avoid sunburn and heat exhaustion.
Click here for NHS Choices Auestions and Answers.


Stings
Knowing how to treat an insect sting and how to recognise when it needs medical attention will help you do the right thing if you or your child are stung.
Insects such as wasps and bees sting as a defence mechanism (when they feel in danger) by injecting poisonous venom into the skin. For most people, stings are painful but harmless. But some people can have an immediate allergic reaction to being stung, which can be very dangerous.
Click here to read more.

Female Health


Cervical Screen Test
Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix. Most women's test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.
Useful Links
NHS Choices - Cervical Screen Test

HPV Vaccination
Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV). There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls. The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

Human papilloma virus (HPV) Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa. There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.
What HPV infection can do
Infection with some types of HPV can cause abnormal tissue growth and other changes to cells, which can lead to cervical cancer. Infection with other forms of HPV can also cause genital warts. Other types of HPV infection can cause minor problems, such as common skin warts and verrucas. Around 30 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact, including those that can cause cervical cancer and genital warts. Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the UK. HPV infection is also linked to vaginal cancer and vulval cancer, although both are rare conditions.
Useful Links NHS choices - HPV Vaccination Cancer Research UK - HPV Virus

Travel Information



If you are considering foreign travel for a holiday or business purposes you may require vaccinations before you go and you need to make an appointment with the practice nurse to discuss your travel arrangements. This will include which countries and areas within countries that you are visiting to determine what vaccinations are required. There is further information about countries and vaccinations on the links below:

Africa Asia (Central)
Asia (East) Australasia & Pacific
Caribbean Central America
Europe & Russia Middle East
North America South America

It is important to make this initial appointment as early as possible - at least 6 weeks before you travel if possible - as further appointments may be necessary with the practice nurse, particularly if a course of vaccinations is required.


Please be aware that not all vaccines are freely available under the NHS and separate fees will be charged.

Healthy Living


Stop Smoking
Useful Links
SmokeFree
NHS Free Smoking Helpline 0800 022 4 332 7 days a week, 7am to 11pm. Here to help you! The NHS have produced "Smokefree", a dedicated service to inform everyone of the dangers of smoking, the benefits to giving up and how they can help you kick the habit.

QUIT
QUIT is the independent charity whose aim is to save lives by helping smokers to stop. Smokers wanting to QUIT should call 0800 00 22 00 or email stopsmoking@quit.org.uk for free, individual, same-day advice from our trained counsellors.
NHS Choices - Stop Smoking NHS Stop Smoking Tracker
This desktop application will help you to stop smoking successfully by providing a 30-day course of daily messages, information and tips straight to your computer.

Eating Well & Exercise
You don't have to spend lots of money to eat well. Watch this video to see dietitian Azmina Govindji explain how you can eat healthily for less.
Useful Links
NHS - Good Food Guide
Information on a healthy diet and ways to make it work for you.

BBC Healthy Living - Nutrition
A good diet is central to overall good health, but which are the best foods to include in your meals, and which ones are best avoided? This section looks at the facts, to help you make realistic, informed choices.

Change for life
These days, 'modern life' can mean that we're a lot less active. With so many opportunities to watch TV or play computer games, and with so much convenience and fast food available, we don't move about as much, or eat as well as we used to. Which means that 9 out of 10 kids today could grow up with dangerous amounts of fat in their bodies. This can cause life-threatening diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and heart disease - so it’s really important that we do something about it.
Click here to visit their website

Sexual Health



Both men and women need to look after their sexual health and take time to understand the issues that surround contraception and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). For instance there are some STIs, like chlamydia, that you could be carrying without having any symptoms. This infection can affect fertility, so it's important to make use of the sexual health services available for free on the NHS.

Useful Links
Sex and Young People
STIs (Sexually Transmitted Infections)
Sexual Health FAQs
Netdoctor - Sex & Relationships

Chlamydia


Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI).
Chlamydia is a bacterial infection, most commonly spread through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex.
75% of people infected with chlamydia don't have any symptoms. However, testing and treatment are simple.
Useful Links
The National Chlamydia Screening Programme (under-25s) has more information on chlamydia.
NHS Choices - Focus on Chlamydia

Contraception


Contraception is free for most people in the UK. With 15 methods to choose from, you'll find one that suits you.


Contraceptive methods allow you to choose when and if you want to have a baby, but they don’t protect you from sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
Condoms help to protect against STIs and pregnancy, so whatever other method of contraception you're using to prevent pregnancy, use condoms as well to protect your and your partner’s health.



The methods of contraception
There are lots of methods to choose from, so don't be put off if the first thing you use isn't quite right for you; you can try another. You can read about each of the different methods of contraception by visiting these pages:

Carers
Looking after someone?
Caring for someone can be very difficult and many people find that they need extra help with the care they provide.
Find out what support you might be able to receive here - provided by NHS Choices. This page also provides lots of help and advice.



Carers Direct - 0808 802 0202
Free, confidential information and advice for carers.


Lines are open 8am to 9pm Monday to Friday, 11am to 4pm at weekends. Calls are free from UK landlines or you can request a free call back.
You can also ask for a call back in one of more than 170 languages.
You can send a query to our advisers by email.
Find out more about the Carers Direct helpline.